How to prepare for your 7 or 10-minute presentation

Overview Figure out what this presentation is about. If you are a giver who is gaining, you are in CCNG for the long haul so you may want to plan out 4 to 6 presentations that cover your business: Your clients: Bread-and-butter, Ideal, Dream.
A portfolio of your recent work How you approach a typical project Expectations around your pricing Your professional resume and background

Focus Start with your key talking points for this particular presentation. There’s no point writing a full script or presentation until you know what points you want to focus on this time. Then, you can stick with a standard format: tell them what you’re going to show them; show them; and, tell them what you just showed them.

Plan Write a script. It lets you write everything out and start massaging the words the way you want. It also gives you a benchmark against which you can practice and refine things. If you practice enough to feel you know your way from one landmark in the script to the next, you can leave the script behind. If you really want something to prompt you, your script becomes your prompt.

Practice against a clock You don’t need to look at it the whole time, but start at the beginning, keep speaking until the end and see how long it took you. If you took 11 minutes for a 7-minute presentation, you have a great opportunity to edit it now. And obvious as it may sound do the editing!

Practice in front of people If you are really nervous about the whole thing , practice, practice, practice! Drum up some friends or family, or give the talk a dry run at your next power team meeting. They all want you to succeed. If something in your talk did not work, be grateful for the opportunity to remove it after your dry run. And remove or replace sections that did not work!

Practice piece by piece This helps you create the mental map that moves you from one point to another as you work through the presentation. Focus on one part, memorize the core elements, run through it till you are comfortable and then move to the next piece. Then it’s just a matter of stringing the pieces together, which is easier.

Practice hands and body If you’re giving a “naked” presentation (with nothing in front of you like a table, etc.) then you need to be aware of what you’re doing with your hands. And your feet. So think about your hand gestures and how they relate to what you’re saying. If you plan to move around, pace in sync with your words

Don’t get hung up on specific words It’s unlikely that missing or changing any one word will totally ruin your presentation, so don’t worry about perfection. The only person that knows you missed a word is you!

Find your speaking style Over time with enough practice you can learn to speak and present in any style, but if you’re in crunch mode and don’t have enough time, just try and find your own speaking style. Find your groove. Some people are ultra-enthusiastic. Some are much calmer. Both are great!

Find your comfort zone All the advice in the world won’t help if you can’t get comfortable with your preparation, practice techniques and ultimately, the presentation itself. Do whatever makes you feel comfortable. The more comfortable you feel, the more confident you feel, and the better things will go. …for your 30 or 60-second presentation

Plan out Figure out what this presentation is about. You may want to plan out 10 – 15 presentations that cover your business, focusing on the niches your business covers, some recent client success stories, some key experience you bring. Once you’ve got them, you can rotate through the list, updating and replacing as new clients come along and your business changes.

Key talking points Start with your key talking points for this particular presentation. You’ve got 30, 45 or 60 seconds. Cover the introduction to you and your business as fast as possible, make this week’s point and follow up with a tagline.

Write a script It lets you write everything out and start massaging the words the way you want. It also gives you a benchmark against which you can practice and refine things. If you practice enough to feel you know your way from one landmark in the script to the next, you can leave it behind on the day. If you really want something to prompt you, your script becomes your prompt.